In Amazon Lightsail what is the instance type in relation to EC2 (instance types) and Availability/uptime?

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Hello, in Amazon Lightsail what is the instance type in relation to EC2 (instance types) and Availability?

Example in EC2 we have in https://aws.amazon.com/pt/ec2/instance-types/ options like T3, T4g and other options, which one is used in Amazon Lightsail? Was it a T3? and if not any of them what would be the CPU used? Lightsail's performance compares to which EC2 would you have any benchmarks on?

As for availability/uptime, is it the same as an EC2, that is, is the availability as good as an EC2? Is Lightsail in the background an EC2 with a certain predefined configuration or is it created in a different way by AWS? I say internally even if we don't see it in our Panel as an EC2.

Are the other HD, Network, DNS and etc resources the same as those that can be used by EC2, but with less flexibility of choice?

I ask to try to understand the difference between Lightsail and EC2, in addition to Lightsail having a clearer price and already coming with HD, Bandwidth, DNS and other features included.

asked 10 months ago367 views
1 Answer
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You can't really compare ec2 with lightsail since it is a VPS. Lightsail guarantees a 99.9% uptime service level agreement (SLA) for each instance, which is similar to EC2. Although last few lightsail instances I have deployed they were corresponding to t2 instance size since lscpu command in ssh session showed E5-2676 v3 intel cpu under the hood. Lightsail is really an attempt to compete with digital ocean, linode and other providers of such one click install services

Yurii B
answered 10 months ago
  • Hi Yurii B, thanks for responding.

    It really seems that the VPS is not EC2 in the form of a pre-assembled package, but rather a traditional and more limited VPS.

    It's a shame that the AWS team wants to respond, as it lacks more technical details between both products/services and comparative testing to facilitate the choice between them.

    Now curious that they promise the same SLA, in theory the EC2 SLA would be expected to be higher.

    Grateful.

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