Unanswered Questions tagged with Amazon Relational Database Service

Content language: English

Sort by most recent

Browse through the questions and answers listed below or filter and sort to narrow down your results.

[Announcement]: Amazon RDS for PostgreSQL 10 deprecation

Amazon RDS for PostgreSQL is announcing deprecation of its PostgreSQL major version 10, starting April 17, 2023. PostgreSQL community plans to deprecate PostgreSQL 10 on November 10, 2022 [1] and it will not receive any security patches after November 10, 2022. We strongly recommend that you monitor the PostgreSQL security page for documented vulnerabilities [2]. We recommend that you take action and upgrade your PostgreSQL databases running on major version 10 to a later major version, such as version 14. PostgreSQL 14 includes performance improvements for parallel queries, heavily-concurrent workloads, partitioned tables, logical replication, and vacuuming. To learn more about the benefits of PostgreSQL 14, please refer to ‘PostgreSQL 14 Community Release Announcement’ [3] To upgrade your DB instance from major version 10, we recommend that you first upgrade your current version of database to a minor version such as 10.19 or later that has an upgrade path to the target major version, and then perform an upgrade to a later major version, such as 14. You can initiate an upgrade by going to the Modify DB Instance page in the AWS Management Console and change the database version setting to a newer major version of PostgreSQL. Alternatively, you can also use the AWS CLI to perform the upgrade. While major version upgrades typically complete within the standard maintenance window, the duration of the upgrade depends on the number of objects within the database. To avoid any unplanned unavailability outside your maintenance window, we recommend that you first take a snapshot of your database and test the upgrade to get an estimate of the upgrade duration. To learn more about upgrading PostgreSQL major versions in RDS, review the 'Upgrading Database Versions' page [4]. The upgrade process will shutdown the database instance, perform the upgrade, and restart the database instance. The DB instance may restart multiple times during the process. If you choose the "Apply Immediately" option, the upgrade will be initiated immediately after clicking on the "Modify DB Instance" button. If you choose not to apply the change immediately, the upgrade will be performed during your next maintenance window. Your affected Amazon RDS DB Instances are listed in "Affected Resources" tab of the AWS Health Dashboard. Starting February 14, 2023 00:00:01 AM UTC, you will not be able to create new RDS instances with PostgreSQL major version 10 from either the AWS Console or the CLI. We recommend you to upgrade your databases before April 17, 2023. RDS will upgrade your PostgreSQL 10 databases to PostgreSQL 14 during a scheduled maintenance window between April 17, 2023 00:00:01 UTC and July 18, 2023 00:00:01 UTC. On July 18, 2023 00:00:01 AM UTC, any PostgreSQL 10 databases that remain will be force upgraded to version 14 regardless of instances’ scheduled maintenance window. If you have any questions or concerns, please reach out to AWS Support [5]. To proactively plan for future PostgreSQL deprecation of major version 11 and above, you can now refer to published RDS for PostgreSQL deprecation dates here [6] [1] https://www.postgresql.org/support/versioning/ [2] https://www.postgresql.org/support/security/ [3] https://www.postgresql.org/about/news/postgresql-14-released-2318/ [4]https://docs.aws.amazon.com/AmazonRDS/latest/UserGuide/USER_UpgradeDBInstance.PostgreSQL.html#USER_UpgradeDBInstance.PostgreSQL.MajorVersion.Process [5] http://aws.amazon.com/support [6] https://docs.aws.amazon.com/AmazonRDS/latest/PostgreSQLReleaseNotes/postgresql-release-calendar.html
0
answers
3
votes
595
views
Aslan
asked 3 months ago

Understand RDS PIOPS, EBS IO and EBS BYTE Balance (%) ?

I have a Posgrest RDS instance using r5.xlarge type. 500GB SSD gp2 type. As I understand, with 500GB gp2, i got a baseline with (3 x 500) = 1500 IOPS. Now I need to increase it to 2500 IOPS, what should I do ? As documents said, I have 2 option (please correct me if I'm wrong) : 1. I can increase the size of DB to ~ 850 ( 3x850 ~ 2500 IOPS) 2. Change the disk type to IO1 and set PIOPS = 2500. 500GB Gp2 cost 115$ per month With option 1, I has to pay 195$ per month. With option 2, I has to pay 115$ + 500$ ( 0.2 * 2500) = 615$ per month. I know that Gp1 Provide more throughput and SLA level, but do I really need to use io1 + PIOPS? Which case should I use it (assume that I just need 99% SLA) ? And one more question, assume that I have RDS with 1000 GB Gp2, so the baseline is 3000 IOPS, what happen if I change it to io1 and set PIOPS to 1000? Now what is the baseline IO of my RDS? 3000 or 1000 or 3000 + 1000 ? ------ I saw EBS IO Balance (%) and EBS Byte Balance (%) in CloudWatch metric, as I understand, it's my reserved balance of (IO and Throughput), but how do I know the absolute value of it ? (So I can count how many IO balance remaining) Let say I have RDS with 1000GB Gp2, as I understand from documents, I got 3000 IOPS, if my RDS used < 3000 IOPS, it will reserved the IO credits to my balance, but what is the maximum balance that I can reserved? I couldn't find the documents said about that. Is there anyway to monitor how RDS consume my IO ( independently of AWS ) ? Thank you so much.
0
answers
0
votes
44
views
asked 3 months ago